Watershed Watch receives funding for Coquitlam watershed projects

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Coquitlam RiverLocated in the City of Coquitlam Watershed Watch works to restore depleted salmon populations and enhance salmon stewardship to the ultimate benefit of a healthy and resilient watershed and local community, in large part through its work with the Kwikwetlem Nation. Restoring urban salmon in the Coquitlam River in turn continues to benefit ecosystem services such as river productivity, riparian health, bird populations, wildlife, and the wealth and resiliency of the community itself. More salmon and wildlife translate to an elevated sense of personal and economic well-being, as well as a stronger desire  to practise salmon stewardship.  Thanks to a grant from the Bullitt Foundation, Watershed Watch will continue these activities and also will develop a ‘quality of life index’ for the watershed.

Watershed Watch and the Kwikwetlem First Nation also received funding from the BC Hydro Fish and Wildlife Compensation Program to fund a riparian planting project and for operating  the sockeye ‘trap and truck’ operations which allow returning adult salmon to pass the dam and spawn in Coquitlam Lake.

Watershed Watch believes watching out for wild salmon must begin in our own back yard. We look forward to undertaking our work with the Kwikwetlem First Nation, the Cities of Coquitlam and Port Coquitlam, Metro Vancouver, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, BC Hydro, and other members of the Coquitlam Watershed Roundtable.

 

Located in the City of Coquitlam Watershed Watch is works to restore depleted salmon populations and enhance salmon stewardship to the ultimate benefit of a healthy and resilient watershed and local community, in large part through its work with the Kwikwetlem Nation. Restoring the urban population of salmon in the Coquitlam River in turn continues to benefit ecosystem services such as river productivity, riparian health, bird populations, wildlife, and the wealth and resiliency of the community itself., as local citizens have More salmon and wildlife translate to in their backyards, and thus an elevated sense of personal and economic well-being, as well as a stronger urge desire to participate practise in salmon stewardship.  Thanks to a grant from the Bullitt Foundation, Watershed Watch will be continue these activities and also as well as working to will develop a ‘quality of life index’ for the watershed.

 

Watershed Watch and the Kwikwetlem First Nation have also received funding from the BC Hydro Fish and Wildlife Compensation Program to fund a riparian planting project and for as well as continuing operating the sockeye ‘trap and truck’ operations which allow returning adult salmon to pass the dam and be able to spawn in Coquitlam Lake.

 

Watershed Watch is believes watching out for the wild salmon must begin in our own back yard. with these projects and is We look forward to continuing undertaking our work with the Kwikwetlem First Nation, the Cities of Coquitlam and Port Coquitlam, Metro Vancouver, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, BC Hydro, and other members of the Coquitlam Watershed Roundtable. in our efforts to restore sockeye salmon to Coquitlam River and improve the overall health of the watershed.

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