Resource: Design possibilities for a regional resource management board for the implementation of the Wild Salmon Policy within the MTTC First Nations’ territories: Discussion Paper

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Authors / Publisher: Marty S. Weinstein for Watershed Watch Salmon Society

Date: June 2007

PDF: Design possibilities for a regional resource management board for the implementation of the Wild Salmon Policy within the MTTC First Nations’ territories: Discussion Paper

Summary:

Watershed Watch and others believe that Canada’s long-anticipated and still-evolving “Wild Salmon Policy”—the goal of which is to “restore and maintain healthy and diverse salmon populations and their habitats for the enjoyment of the people of Canada in perpetuity”—is progressive and worthy of support.

The “WSP” is being implemented through six strategies and specific objectives linked to conservation, planning, governance, and performance. One of these strategies seemed particularly worthy of our immediate attention: Strategy 4. The purpose of Strategy 4 is “to develop long-term strategic plans for CUs [Conservation Units] and groups of CUs and their habitat….” Strategy 4 specifically suggests that planning will be facilitated by the formation of several local “governance” or “management” boards, yet it is not prescriptive on what, how, who, or other details.

Watershed Watch thus decided to explore how we might collectively advance strategic planning as per the intent of Strategy 4 of the WSP. We wanted to learn more about what to consider prior to establishing, populating, and funding so-called ‘regional management boards.’ In essence, we hoped to offer suggestions for the most effective model.

Because we work with the Musgamagw Tsawataineuk Tribal Council (MTTC) on serious salmon conservation issues in the Broughton Archipelago, we chose to focus on WSP strategic planning needs in the territory of the First Nations who comprise the MTTC.

To that end—and through the support of the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation—we approached long-time resident and governance specialist Dr. Marty Weinstein, a resident of Alert Bay, and asked him to write a discussion paper on this subject. Dr. Weinstein’s review is provided here as a contribution to the advancement of the Wild Salmon Policy.